Hey Miles! I'm a total newbie when it comes to this and this article has been EXTREMELY helpful, so thank you! I am extremely grateful! I do have a question though and I'm hoping you have an answer and/or an alternative solution to this. I'm trying to use a custom domain name with my ClickFunnels account by integrating it via WordPress. I've installed the ClickFunnels plugin on my WordPress site and connected it with the API key and was able to set up the pages I wanted and the links I wanted to use for each step of my funnel, however; whenever I go to the links to test the sites it just redirects to a 404 page. I'm not sure what is going on and I can't find anything on the internet that suggests why this is happening. The weird thing is that I can get the Optin page to work if I set it as the Homepage in the ClickFunnels plugin but when you advance to the Thank You page it uses the bulky unattractive ClickFunnels link. Have you seen this before? If not, do you have a better way of using custom domain names with ClickFunnels?
The warmer your visitors are, the more likely they are to convert on the offer you're promoting. Sometimes, they need more time and more attention. That's the purpose of a Multi-Step Pre-Selling funnel. You're not just sending people to your optin page. Once they join your list, they are redirected to a 2nd page, delivering more content, educating them on the offer and thus pre-selling it for you! This is a highly effective weapon that can 3x your sales.
People love to watch videos. Is it any wonder why Youtube and Facebook are competing for your videos? We've designed fully based video funnels to engage with your audience and drive conversions through the roof. Our videos are not salesly, they frame the problem and what kind of solutions can be found. They then ask for the click or the optin based on the landing page objective (redirect or collect leads, your choice)
SkimLinks is probably best for bloggers who want to write content around the affiliate link rather than add affiliate links to existing products. SkimLinks offers a lot of tools to compare commission rates and offers in order to customize your content to optimize your income. Once nice aspect of SkimLinks is that it offers lots of products for non-US creators, including popular UK brands like John Lewis and Tesco.
In the case of cost per mille/click, the publisher is not concerned about whether a visitor is a member of the audience that the advertiser tries to attract and is able to convert, because at this point the publisher has already earned his commission. This leaves the greater, and, in case of cost per mille, the full risk and loss (if the visitor cannot be converted) to the advertiser.
In the case of cost per mille/click, the publisher is not concerned about whether a visitor is a member of the audience that the advertiser tries to attract and is able to convert, because at this point the publisher has already earned his commission. This leaves the greater, and, in case of cost per mille, the full risk and loss (if the visitor cannot be converted) to the advertiser.
Amazing article. One question I have is about how to avoid the risk of FB terminating an ad account for using it to drive traffic to this kind of landing page. The first part of that question is, do you think a simple opt-in page like you described (with no content other than a "hook" that FB might argue is deceptive) would result in the ad being disapproved and possibly the ad account at risk of being terminated? The second part of the question is do you think the FB ad itself would need to be toned down, or do you think it's safe to just repeat the hook? It seems like FB is getting more and more strict about this kind of thing.
A browser extension is a plug-in that extends the functionality of a web browser. Some extensions are authored using web technologies such as HTML, JavaScript, and CSS. Most modern web browsers have a whole slew of third-party extensions available for download. In recent years, there has been a constant rise in the number of malicious browser extensions flooding the web. Malicious browser extensions will often appear to be legitimate as they seem to originate from vendor websites and come with glowing customer reviews.[32] In the case of affiliate marketing, these malicious extensions are often used to redirect a user’s browser to send fake clicks to websites that are supposedly part of legitimate affiliate marketing programs. Typically, users are completely unaware this is happening other than their browser performance slowing down. Websites end up paying for fake traffic number, and users are unwitting participants in these ad schemes.
SkimLinks is primarily for established content producers (bloggers) who want to monetize their content. With a powerful WordPress plugin and scripts for just about any website type, setting up SkimLinks is very easy. And because you have access to all offers on their platform after you’re approved, SkimLinks is very well designed for affiliates who don’t want to spend a lot of time fiddling around with settings and other fine-tuning.
The concept of affiliate marketing on the Internet was conceived of, put into practice and patented by William J. Tobin, the founder of PC Flowers & Gifts. Launched on the Prodigy Network in 1989, PC Flowers & Gifts remained on the service until 1996. By 1993, PC Flowers & Gifts generated sales in excess of $6 million per year on the Prodigy service. In 1998, PC Flowers and Gifts developed the business model of paying a commission on sales to the Prodigy Network.[8][9]
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