Shopify has three different account types as well as standalone third-party products like themes and apps. Commissions are paid for sales of any of these products, including users who sign up for a 14-day free trial and then convert to a paid account. Shopify also has a wide range of blog posts, webinars, and video tutorials that can be linked to with the standard commission paid on any sales that are generated.

I do agree that my wording was a bit 'aggressive' in the video... With that said, I am still driving traffic from FB directly to landing pages that have ~15 words max on them, to this day! My ad copy and my landing page copy are super similar... And I get a high relevance score... I've had no problems at all. One thing I recommend is setting up a business.facebook.com account, then setting up as many ad accounts as you can (not adding any credit card to them, tho) to just have some extra accounts there... Just in case.


Great post Perrin! I think one of the biggest problems that rarely gets talked about are the nexus laws that restrict certain states from being accepted into an affiliate program. Currently, those states are Arkansas, Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Illinois, Kansas, Maine, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Tennessee, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia.

I 1st learned about affiliate marketing back in 2005 when I went on Walmart.com as a thought came to me to visit the site for no reason. Not long afterwards, I started a free blog on blogspot, not knowing what I was doing nor knowing anything about blogging. 2006 came and I flew to Santa Barbara, California to an event to see how real affiliate marketing was. Then I struggled as years went by with online marketing. I made money from eBaY, Walmart, and a few other affiliate programs. Been hooked ever since. I do create content now on a daily basis and love the side hustle millionaire mentality. I wish I knew how to do this back in 1999 when I was still working crappy jobs. I prolly would’ve been close to $20 million richer by now and loaded with $ gUaP $ ! :-)


In November 1994, CDNow launched its BuyWeb program. CDNow had the idea that music-oriented websites could review or list albums on their pages that their visitors might be interested in purchasing. These websites could also offer a link that would take visitors directly to CDNow to purchase the albums. The idea for remote purchasing originally arose from conversations with music label Geffen Records in the fall of 1994. The management at Geffen wanted to sell its artists' CD's directly from its website but did not want to implement this capability itself. Geffen asked CDNow if it could design a program where CDNow would handle the order fulfillment. Geffen realized that CDNow could link directly from the artist on its website to Geffen's website, bypassing the CDNow home page and going directly to an artist's music page.[14]
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